Tag Archives: NIDA

DEA Information Removed From Site

Back in January ASA filed a suit against the DEA about information that was on the Public Website for the DEA that was faulty.  The DEA removed information from the site.

We were interested in what did the DEA remove from it’s website.  We filed a FOIA request with them and received a response.  In the response it appears the DEA has only removed two documents from it’s website.  The total content of materials removed constitute about 17 pages mostly dealing with Medical Cannabis.

The Documents they released are here at this link 17-00351-F documents

While this is a small victory it could lead to additional victories against other agencies which use essentially the same information on their sites.

If you would like to see the other information we have collected from the DEA and other agencies check this link – DEA FOIA

Congressional Research Service Report on Cannabis

On March 10th the Congressional Research Service released it’s report on “The Marijuana Policy Gap and the Path Forward”

“Given the current marijuana policy gap between the federal government and many of the states, there are a number of issues that Congress may address. These include, but are not limited to, issues surrounding availability of financial services for marijuana businesses, federal tax treatment, oversight of federal law enforcement, allowance of states to implement medical marijuana laws and involvement of federal health care workers, and consideration of marijuana as a Schedule I drug under the CSA. The marijuana policy gap has widened each year for some time. It has only been a few years since states began to legalize recreational marijuana, but over 20 years since they began to legalize medical marijuana. In addressing state – level legalization efforts and considering marijuana’s current placement on Schedule I, Congress could take one of several routes. It could elect to take no action, thereby upholding the federal government’s current marijuana policy. It may also decide that the CSA must be enforced in states and not allow them to implement conflicting laws on marijuana. Alternatively, Congress could choose to reevaluate marijuana’s placement as a Schedule I controlled substance.”

Here is the document – R44782

And a link to the CRS report

VA releases Medical Cannabis Report

If anyone has been watching the VA website they had a report about the medical use of Cannabis for Pain and PTSD.  The document has not been available for the public but through the power of the Freedom of Information Act we were able to get a copy.

This 124 page, well researched document is probably one of the most extensive looks at Cannabis done by a Government agency.  It not only looks at the use of Cannabis for Pain and PTSD but also looks at the harms of Cannabis use.

While they didn’t find much quality research on the medical use of Cannabis for Pain or PTSD they did find a lot of information.  The research they cite from all kinds of sources indicate that the lack of research is limiting their ability to make quality decisions on Cannabis for Medicine or Safety.

CONCLUSIONS

Although cannabis is increasingly available for medical and recreational use, there is very little methodologically rigorous evidence examining its effects in patients with chronic pain or PTSD. There is limited evidence that cannabis may be helpful in improving pain and spasticity in selected populations with MS, but there is insufficient evidence in other populations. There is insufficient evidence examining the effects of cannabis in PTSD populations. Cannabis is associated with an increased risk of short-term adverse effects, but data on its effects on long- term physical health vary; harms in older patients or those with multiple comorbidities have not been studied. Cannabis has been associated with short-term cognitive impairment and potentially serious mental health adverse effects such as psychotic symptoms, though the absolute risk and application specifically to chronic pain and PTSD populations are uncertain.

You can get the entire document here at this link – Benefits and harms of cannabis in chronic pain or post traumatic stree disorder

DEA/DOJ not the Problem

I’m sorry but the DEA/DOJ are not the problem with Cannabis legalization on a federal level or even Scheduling of Cannabis.  The real problem is with HHS, FDA, NIDA and other “Medical” organizations that continue to feed DEA/DOJ faulty information.

While I’m not going to say that the DEA doesn’t want to have Cannabis in Schedule I for ease of prosecution, they are not to blame for failed Petitions.  The problem is in the petition process.  First the DEA is required to ask the FDA, NIH for a recommendation.  Well they both ask NIDA to give them the information and everyone knows that NIDA is opposed to Cannabis.

NIDA provides FDA and NIH with information about Cannabis and all it’s “Hazards”.  Rather than do a real investigation like it’s own PubMed and other resources it barfs up NIDA information and gives it to the DEA.

DEA then takes that information and says sorry not going to change anything.

There is also the fact that the petitions in the past 6-7 years have been faulty in their filing and haven’t been really challenged in court.

HIA has offered DEA resistance and met with success.  ASA is currently suing the DEA for it’s compliance with the little known “INFORMATION QUALITY ACT”.  This requires agencies to provide Quality Information when they give it out.  Frankly NIH, NIDA and any other agency that has information opposing Cannabis should be challenged.

If your not following on social media NIH, FDA, and NIDA then you should be:

FDA https://www.facebook.com/FDA/

NIDA https://www.facebook.com/NIDANIH/

NIH https://www.facebook.com/nih.gov/

USDA https://www.facebook.com/USDA/

DEA and Marijuana Extract Means.. NOTHING

On Dec 14th the DEA announced a new drug code for “Marijuana Extract” and there has been a lot of furor over the decision.  For those that have read the CSA and understand the meaning of the definition of “Marijuana” it already meant:

The term “marihuana” means all parts of the plant Cannabis sativa L., whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of such plant; and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such plant, its seeds or resin. Such term does not include the mature stalks of such plant, fiber produced from such stalks, oil or cake made from the seeds of such plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such mature stalks (except the resin extracted therefrom), fiber, oil, or cake, or the sterilized seed of such plant which is incapable of germination.

Prior to this announcement everything other than THC, which already has it’s own drug code, all other Cannabinoids were classified under the Marijuana Code.  What this does is separate out for purposes of clerical and data collection a difference between raw Cannabis plant material and Extractions made from the plant.

NOTHING has changed, no substance scheduling has changed, no laws have been changed.

So what does it really mean?  What it really means is that now the extracts that researchers have been getting from the Mississippi Farm now have a separate code.  This allows the DEA, FDA, HHS, NIDA to track what kind of research is being done.  Is it whole plant or an extract that is being used.

Frankly it wouldn’t be a bad idea to put each cannabinoid it’s own drug code.  This could do two things.  First it would track what research is being done with what cannabinoids.  It could also lead to many more cannabinoids being put into different schedules like THC is in a different schedule.  One by one move the cannabinoids to other schedules and you less reason to keep the whole plant scheduled in schedule I

 

Cannabis, Safe & Effective

There are a lot of studies that have been completed and many more that are awaiting start.  You can find studies on what cannabis at ClinicalTrial.Gov and search for Cannabis – Marijuana – Cannabinoids and other terms and come up with all kinds of results.

fedregWhere you can really find heads up is the Federal Register.  There you will find people that are applying to obtain licenses from the DEA to handle Cannabis (search for 7360 the DEA code for Marijuana).  When they apply under law there is a comment period where persons, organizations and companies can make comment on the application.  Most of the time there is no comment made and then the DEA decides if they are going to grant or not. However if there are comments made then the DEA incorporates these comments into their reply to the application when they grant or deny.

nih1Finally there is also PubMed where you can search all kinds of different things.  You will find information like this from  Medical Marijuana: Just the Beginning of a Long, Strange Trip? C.D. Ciccone, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Department of Physical Therapy, Ithaca College.

Although there is still a need for randomized controlled clinical trials, preliminary studies have suggested that medical marijuana and related cannabinoids may be beneficial in treating chronic pain, inflammation, spasticity, and other conditions seen commonly in physical therapist practice. Physical therapists should therefore be aware of the options that are available for patients considering medical marijuana, and be ready to provide information for these patients. Clinicians should also be aware that marijuana can produce untoward effects on cognition, coordination, balance, and cardiovascular and pulmonary function, and be vigilant for any problems that may arise if patients are using cannabinoids during physical rehabilitation.

So it’s clear from the information available that THC, Cannabidiol along with all of the other cannabinoids and substances in Plant based Cannabis

  •  does not produce any unknown adverse effects or other effects that are extremely common in Pharmaceutical preparations.
  •  does not have an unattainable LD-50 level (another indicator of overall safety).
  • has shown therapeutic actions that are beneficial to many patients.

So there is no reason why companies should need to rely on synthetic versions of the various cannabinoid and plant compounds.  They should be allowed to use the whole plant and the various strains of the plant to treat any condition.

Given the safety of the substances, the variety of administration methods there is no reason not to use trial and error.  As has been seen with Charlotte’s Web there are strains that work better for some conditions.  As the science of cannabis expands so will the introduction of strain specific treatments.  There isn’t a reason to not be able to move from one concentration of substances to another just like doctors change medications that aren’t producing the desired results to ones that do work.

Not every medication works for every person.  It happens all the time in medicine, a doctor prescribes something and it just doesn’t work or produce the desired effect.  Change drugs to something similar and bingo it works.  Doctors can’t explain it, Pharmacy companies can’t explain it, the FDA can’t explain it.  Given the great number of varieties already developed and those that will be developed that lots of conditions can be treated with cannabis.

Cannabis has a long history of being safe and effective.  There is no reason that all cannabis can’t be used by patients because of this safety when used.  Unlike other medications that can produce irreversible affects, cannabis just doesn’t do that to patients.

Prof at U of Miss has Medical Cannabis

For those that don’t know the University of Mississippi grows cannabis for medical experiments.  What exactly they grow, and what they process isn’t totally known but a little bit has been leaked by the Prof in charge himself.

Prof ElSohly has been growing cannabis since 1975 under contract with NIDA, FDA and the DEA.  Under his contract he produces Medical Grade cannabis products.  Apparently he grows a number of varieties, makes a number of different products all of which are designed to be used for Medical purposes.

In a Rare appearance before a Justice Summit he explained the problems with Medical Cannabis and how he solved them.  The presentation he gives is long and is extremely detailed about the various cannabinoids and terpenes that are found in Cannabis and how they already know what some of them do.

A1The interesting part is his explaining how they grow and process their cannabis to make medical products for others to test and use.  First they do not rely on seed they, like most growers, they clone plants and then put them outside to finish growing.  On their 18 acre facility they grow and produce all the medical grade cannabis legally available in the United States.

As you watch the video below you will see how he describes in detail how they process cannabis they grow and produce medical grade cannabis.  All that remains to be done with his work is to get it FDA approved.

FDA approval requires a number of things, all of which Prof ElSohly has done.  He, and his team, grow under controlled conditions and produce medical grade cannabis by following the rules of manufacture and processing.  Thus he produces true medical grade cannabis.