Tag Archives: State cannabis laws

Pharmacists want more information

pmcIn a First of it’s kind study posted to PubMED shows that pharmacists want more information about medical cannabis.   The study conducted in Minnesota prior to Minnesota’s medical Cannabis program implementation shows that Pharmacists want more information on medical cannabis.  The Study was done by Joy Hwang, PharmD, MPH, Tom Arneson, MD, MPH, and Wendy St. Peter, PharmD

First the report determines that Minnesota Pharmacists, in general, have limited Knowledge of cannabis polices, regulations and felt they were not adequately trained.

Pharmacists reported limited knowledge of Minnesota state-level cannabis policies and regulations and felt that they were inadequately trained in cannabis pharmacotherapy. Most pharmacists were unprepared to counsel patients on medical cannabis and had many concerns regarding its availability and usage. Only a small proportion felt that the medical cannabis program would impact their practice. Pharmacists’ leading topics of interest for more education included Minnesota’s regulations on the medical cannabis program, cannabis pharmacotherapy, and the types and forms of cannabis products available for commercialization.

Unlike most states which have legal medical Cannabis Minnesota and a couple others have Licensed Pharmacists as the dispensers.  However in Minnesota these pharmacists are trained by their respective companies and have a great deal of knowledge about Cannabis use for medical purposes.

In these three states, pharmacists provide registered patients with consultations at one of the state-approved cannabis distribution centers. Moreover, they are the only health care professionals who are permitted to dispense cannabis products. This distinguishes these states from most other legalization states, where cannabis products—both medical and recreational—can be purchased from retail dispensaries that operate under the guidance of certified personnel known as “budtenders.”

The study was done to assess gaps in knowledge and concerns of Minnesota pharmacists.  The study conducted voluntarily via a web-based survey and had a 10% response rate by the states Pharmacists. The questionnaire had 14 questions they asked the pharmacists and also room for them to put in their own comments.

The majority of the respondents completed the survey and reported little concern about medical cannabis.

Most pharmacists rated themselves on the lower end of the Likert scale for self-perceived knowledge about medical cannabis and readiness to counsel patients on medical cannabis use (1 = poor; 7 = excellent) and concerns about medical cannabis use under the Minnesota program (1 = no concern; 7 = most concern)

Almost 90% of the respondents responded that they were less than moderately prepared to provide counseling services to patients using cannabis for medical purposes.

Pharmacists in general want more education.  This survey is of all pharmacists registered in Minnesota. Of those only a small number of them actually work with cannabis patients in the clinics that are available.  However it’s clear from this study that they want more education on Cannabis.

Respondents were very interested in learning more about medical cannabis in the following areas: state-specific rules and regulation (87%), pharmacotherapy (88%), and available types and forms of products on the market (82%). Fifty-three percent were interested in learning more about federal laws related to marijuana. Only 7% indicated no interest in learning more about any of these topics.

The study was conducted 2 months prior to Minnesota implementation of it’s cannabis program and there was a great deal of confusion about it.  Since the time of the survey information from a variety of sources including educational presentations to many hospitals, clinics, and hospital-clinic organizations in Minnesota with pharmacists as part of the audience, The University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Medical School and School of Nursing, full-day educational symposium on medical cannabis in April 2016, the Minnesota Pharmacists Association (MPhA) and the Minnesota College of Clinical Pharmacists.

The Study Concludes:

This study suggests that Minnesota pharmacists were not sufficiently prepared to work with patients in the medical cannabis program. Of those who provided survey responses, an overwhelming majority felt incompetent in medical cannabis clinical knowledge; however, almost half were unconcerned about the potential impact the program’s implementation would have on their practice. Nonetheless, pharmacists were interested in learning about medical cannabis and its state-specific regulation. Targeted education regarding cannabis pharmacotherapy, product availability and variability, and state-specific regulations should be available for health care professionals practicing in states with medical cannabis programs prior to program implementation and patient access.

 

Link to the study here – LINK

Copy of the study here – minnesota-pharmacists-and-medical-cannabis_-a-survey-of-knowledge-concerns-and-interest-prior-to-program-launch

 

The State of The States, Cannabis

wss_skunk_cured_budEvery year the president, governors, city leaders give a state of the state address so we thought why not make a state of the states for Cannabis.  We’ve been able to kinda find all the laws as they are now, subject to change in Nov, so people can see the number of states that have legalized cannabis for one use or another.

It’s actually a pretty impressive list, a few years ago this list would have been much shorter

Alaska Stat. §§ 17.37.010 et seq. (medical), §§ 17.38.010 et seq. (recreational);
Arizona Rev. Stat. §§ 36-2801 et seq. (medical);
California Health & Safety Code §§ 11362.5 et seq. (medical);
Colorado Rev. Stat. §§ 12-43.3-101 et seq. (medical), §§ 12-43.4-101 et seq. (recreational);
Connecticut Gen. Stat. §§ 21a-408 et seq. (medical);
Delaware Code Ann. tit. 16, §§ 4901A et seq. (medical);
D.C. Code §§ 7.1671.01 et seq.(medical);
Hawaii Rev. Stat. §§ 329-121 et seq. (medical);
Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. 130/1 et seq.(medical);
Maine Rev. Stat. tit. 22, §§ 2421 et seq. (medical);
Maryland Code Ann. Health-Gen §§ 13-3301 et seq. (medical);
Massachusetts Ann. Laws ch. 94C, §§ Appx. 1 et seq. (medical);
Michigan Comp. Laws Serv. §§ 333.26421 et seq. (medical);
Minnesota Stat. Ann. §§ 152.27 et seq. (medical);
Nevada Rev. Stat. §§ 453A.___ [2015 ch. 401, § 29] et seq. (medical);
New Hampshire Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 126-X:2 et seq. (medical);
New Jersey Stat. Ann. §§ 24:6I-1 et seq. (medical);
New Mexico Stat. Ann. §§ 26-2B-1 et seq. (medical);
New York CLS Pub. Health Law §§ 1004.1 et seq. (medical);
Oregon Rev. Stat. §§ 475.300 et seq. (medical), Or. Rev. Stat. §§ ___.___ [2015 c.1, § 3] et seq. (recreational);
Rhode Island Gen. Laws §§ 21-28.6-1 et seq. (medical);
Vermont Stat. Ann. tit. 18 §§ 4472 et seq. (medical);
Washington. Rev. Code §§ 69.51A et seq. (medical), Rev. Code §§ 69.50.360, 69.50.363, 69.50.66, 69.50.401 (recreational).