Tag Archives: WHO

World Health Organization to Review Cannabis

It is going largely unknown, unreported and ignored that the World Health Organization (WHO) the arm of the UN that controls the schedule of substances is looking at Cannabis.

As part of the UN the US and the FDA is looking for input from people and organizations about the changes and surprisingly no one is commenting.  The comment period ends Feb 10th at midnight eastern time and so far they have gotten 3 comments.

https://www.regulations.gov/docket?D=FDA-2016-N-4619

3 comments, that is really pretty sad considering a change in the scheduling of Cannabis on an international level could lead to changes in scheduling on a federal level here in the US.

The United States is also a party to the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs (1961 Single Convention). The Secretary of State has received a notification from the Secretary-General regarding two substances to be considered for control under this convention. The CSA does not require HHS to publish a summary of such information in the Federal Register. Nevertheless, in an effort to provide interested and affected persons an opportunity to submit comments regarding the WHO recommendations for narcotic drugs, the notification regarding these substances is also included in this Federal Register notice. The comments will be shared with other relevant Agencies to assist the Secretary of State in formulating the position of the United States on the control of these substances. The HHS recommendations are not binding on the representative of the United States in discussions and negotiations relating to the proposal regarding control of substances under the 1961 Single Convention.

Of the substances being considered

The Committee recommended that a specific ECDD meeting dedicated to cannabis and its component substances should be held within the next eighteen months from the 38th meeting, and will carry out pre-reviews for the following substances:

—Cannabis plant and cannabis resin;

—Extracts and tinctures of cannabis;

—Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC);

—Cannabidiol (CBD);

—Stereoisomers of THC.

The recommendations and the assessments and findings on which they are based are set out in detail in the Report of the 38th Expert Committee on Drug Dependence, which is the Committee that advises me on these issues. An extract of the Committee’s Report is attached in Annex 1 to this letter.

 

Here is a copy of the WHO Review Report – WHO-cannabis-report

 

 

WHO – Systematic Review of Cannabis Safety

who-report-safeIn a report to the upcoming WHO conference another report has been issued about the safety of Cannabis and it’s use in medicine.

The report acknowledges thousands of years of historical use of cannabis for medical purposes.  Unfortunately due to the limited number of published scientific studies on the few conditions they studied they didn’t find definitive proof of cannabis efficacy in the treatment.

What they did find is that in all cases there weren’t adverse side effects like other medications.

In regards to adverse events, the included studies considered many adverse events, the majority of them were of low to moderate gravity. For the most serious adverse events (i.e. CNS side effects, depression and confusion) no differences were observed between cannabis and placebo. Incidence of general psychiatric disorders was higher in the cannabis groups but results came only from two small studies (92 participants). In addition, frequency of dissociation was higher in the cannabis groups, and no studies considered the development of abuse or dependence.

The report Titled “Systematic reviews on therapeutic efficacy and safety of Cannabis (including extracts and tinctures) for patients with multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, dementia and Tourette syndrome, HIV/AIDS, and cancer receiving chemotherapy Laura Amato, Marina Davoli, Silvia Minozzi, Zuzana Mitrova, Elena Parmelli, Rosella Saulle, Simona Vecchi DEPARTMENT OF EPIDEMIOLOGY LAZIO REGION, ASL ROMA 1 – ROME, ITALY”

Can be found at the following link – LINK

or we have archived it here – systematic_reviews_on_therapeutic_efficacy_and_safety

Therapeutic Cannabinoid Research

WHO Pre-review Report Cannabis and Cannabis resin

With the upcoming meeting of the World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Drug Dependence Thirty-eight Meeting in Geneva, on 14 – 18 November 2016 many are calling for Cannabis to be an agenda item.

coverIn a pre-view Report “Cannabis and Cannabis Resin Pre-Review Report A document prepared for the World Health Organization” was prepared by H. Valerie Curran, Philip Wiffen, David J. Nutt, Willem Scholten.  In their report they give all the reasons why Cannabis should be more than an Update Item on the agenda.

In their report to the WHO they state in the preface:

In the eighty years since cannabis and cannabis resin were last reviewed by the Health Committee of the League of Nations in 1935, both the social context of cannabis use and the science of drug dependence have dramatically changed. Yet, cannabis and cannabis resin continue to remain under the strictest control regime possible under the Single Convention, without a valid scientific re-assessment of this decision. Cannabis and cannabis resin are listed in Schedule I and Schedule IV respectively, which means that both remain strictly prohibited worldwide.

then adding that the WHO is acting in a manner that appears to make continued prohibition illegitimate

The current scheduling of cannabis is in marked divergence with the Convention’s principle that scheduling of substances should be based on a scientific assessment by WHO. In the absence of a recent assessment, the continued prohibition of cannabis appears completely illegitimate even though it may be legal.

38ccdThey then proceed to ask the WHO to conduct a Scientific Review of cannabis and cannabis resin

A scientific review by the WHO, the only authoritative global body to make such an assessment, would greatly legitimize international policies and their national implementation. A scientific assessment of cannabis and cannabis resin appears most timely given the many debates that have emerged on this issue across the world in recent years.

In the fifty years since it’s inception the WHO has never conducted a scientific review of cannabis.  Despite it’s mandate to review the substance.

The scheduling under the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs assumes a scientific justification. However, cannabis and cannabis resin have never been evaluated by WHO since it was mandated the review of psychoactive substances in 1948.

The purpose of the pre-review report is to clarify the position of the current state of use both medically and none medically.

The purpose of a Pre-review is to determine whether current information justifies a Critical Review. For evaluating substances in a Pre-review, the categories of information are identical to those used in Critical Reviews. At the stage of the Pre-review, the Expert Committee must decide whether the information justifies a Critical Review. If it finds that the data available may justify changing the scheduling of cannabis and/or cannabis resin, the Committee should recommend a Critical Review in its next Meeting.

The 53 page report, or 75 with cites, covers everything from adverse reactions, LD50 level, and pretty much everything you ever wanted to know about cannabis and how it works.  The report is remarkable in it’s completeness.

Conclusions Despite that the scheduling system of substances under the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs is supposed to be based on scientific assessments, the WHO has never reviewed cannabis and cannabis resin. This means also that the Expert Committee continues to recommend that cannabis is not to be used medically despite growing evidence of considerable medical use world-wide, including the availability of a pharmaceutical preparation with a marketing authorization in multiple countries. Many countries are struggling with the impact of the prohibition of cannabis with its wide negative impact on societies (including through human rights violations) and on drug markets and drug use, including on the market of synthetic cannabinoids.

Committee recommendations are needed on the following topics:

1. Whether a Critical Review should be conducted for reviewing the current scheduling in Schedules I and IV. Each of the following reasons would justify a recommendation for a Critical Review: a. because WHO has never conducted a Critical Review, meaning that there is no scientific justification for the current scheduling; b. because the wide-spread medical use, including the use of preparations with a marketing authorization is in contradiction to listing in Schedule IV; c. because it is not clear whether the dependence-producing properties of cannabis and cannabis resin are between codeine and morphine (justification for Schedule I) or between dextropropoxyphene and codeine (justification for Schedule II) or below those of dextropropoxyphene (justification for not scheduling).

2. On the medical use of cannabis and its preparations (which can include revoking old recommendations by the Committee)

3. On the need of quality control on cannabis and cannabis products for medical and non-medical use.

Here is a link to the piece – LINK

Here is the report itself just in case it disappears from the net – whocannabisreport

Therapeutic Cannabinoid Research